Rolling Pins

Manufacturing of Custom Wooden Rolling Pins

From all-purpose to precision, Wells Wood Turning provides a wide variety of rolling pins for passionate, commercial and periodic bakers alike. Our rolling pins, manufactured in different hardwoods at the mill in Buckfield, Maine, USA, are sold by retailers, specialty cookie and biscuit businesses, and high-quality housewares and gift-product companies around the country.

We manufacture custom and proprietary rolling pins — many of the most popular rolling pins on the market today — under exclusive contract. Contact us to discuss your design and production requirements. We have the manufacturing capacity to supply a nationwide rollout.

CONTACT US

  • Made in Maine from sustainably sourced hardwoods
  • Design assistance and large-scale production recommendations
  • A variety of styles, sizes and species, including yellow birch, rock maple, walnut, cherry
  • Custom handles finished with clear varnish or a product-line color
  • Assembly of axles, bearings, handles; labeling and bagging
  • Sanding and finishing with food-safe wax or wood oil
  • Embossing or pad printing your logo, solidifying your brand

Not All Rolling Pins Are Created Equal

Choosing the right rolling pin can make the difference between a perfect pie crust and an also-ran. Choosing the right rolling pin manufacturer can make the difference between marketing success and brand failure. At Wells, we can manufacture many styles of this cylindrical food preparation utensil used to make dough for cookies, biscuits, pies, dumplings, turnovers, pizza and more. Each style has its own advantages, as they are used in different cooking and baking applications.

Rollers – With a thick, heavy barrel and thinner handles on the ends, rollers are typically known as the “baker’s rolling pin.” They are the most widely used in kitchens across the United States, and come in a variety of diameters, lengths and handle styles. The barrel spins around the handles, which are attached to a steel axle that runs through a hole along the barrel. Nylon or steel bearings facilitate the spin. Smaller sizes are intended for children or for adults making mini-pies or personal-sized pizzas!

Tapered rods – Increasingly popular, tapered rods do not have handles, giving them a lighter weight. These pins have a profile similar to a baton, with a wider middle and more narrow ends. Commonly referred to as French pastry pins, these tapered rods give an experienced user more control over the pin, making it easier to get a feel for the texture of the dough. The style can come in many different widths and lengths, although a drawback may be the shorter length of the flat surface area on the pin. Tapered rods are also used in Turkish and East Asian kitchens, especially for Chinese dumplings.

Straight dowels – Simply a straight cylinder running up to 20 inches long, the dowel pin rolls across the dough using the palm of your hands. Known as the column style, this pin is perfect for pizza or large sheets of pastry dough. The pin is heavy enough to roll dough but not heavy enough so as to be difficult to use. And there are no handles to get in the way. This style is also very useful in crushing Graham crackers, nuts or chocolate. One potential drawback of the typically longer size is that the straight dowel might not fit into your standard kitchen drawer!

Fixed-height pins – No tape measure of calipers required, here! For precision baking, fixed-height rolling pins enable you to roll your dough to a specified height, with even thickness across the pastry. Heights are often 1/8, ¼ or 3/8, and are determined by the difference in distance (or height) from the “wheels” or ends of the pin to the barrel. The pin is often long, so you can roll out a larger sheet of cookie or biscuit dough at one time. Fixed-height pins can come with fixed (non-spinning) handles, rotating handles or no handles at all.
CONTACT US

Rolling Pins Need Loving Care!

“How do I clean my rolling pin?” is a question we often get. Care is actually very simple, with a few straightforward guidelines. First, after using your pin, remove as much dough as you can by hand or blunt utensil. Avoid scraping the wood. Second, wash with warm, very mildly soapy water and dry immediately. Third, from time to time, you should condition the wood with beeswax or mineral oil. DO NOT soak your rolling pin in the sink or put it through the dishwasher, as these approaches will cause warping and crack the wood. That’s it!

That Stubborn Sticker from the Store

Sometimes, upon bringing your rolling pin home from the store, you may find that the retail store may have applied a pesky price or barcode sticker to the barrel. This is a minor aggravation that that can be removed with a little vegetable oil. Be sure to wash your pin before using it for the first time!

Why Wooden Rolling Pins?

With the right balance of size, weight, and function, wooden rolling pins are built to last. With straight-forward care and maintenance, a wooden rolling pin can last a generation, being passed along as a family or business heirloom. Pins made of alternative materials like steel or silicone can be too heavy and smash your dough, creating cracks and sticky pastry. A metal pin can lift whole swaths of dough onto the surface of the barrel. Also, metal pins tend to have a smoother, non-textured finish, making it harder to dust your pin with flour to prevent sticking. It is true, however, that marble pins can be chilled for successfully rolling specific types of pastry, whereas wood cannot.